Classical Airs

Classical concerts and conversations by author, broadcaster, conductor Paul E. Robinson

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  • CLASSICAL CONVERSATIONS

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    Paul in conversation with RICHARD BUCKLEY (PART THREE), principal conductor, Austin Lyric Opera, (Austin, Texas, March 2011)

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    Paul in conversation with RICHARD BUCKLEY (PART TWO), principal conductor, Austin Lyric Opera, (Austin, Texas, March 2011)

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    Paul in conversation with RICHARD BUCKLEY (PART ONE), principal conductor, Austin Lyric Opera, (Austin, Texas, March 2011)

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    Paul in conversation with ROBERT OPPELT (PART ONE), principal bouble bass, National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), Washington, D.C., (November 19, 2010)

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    Paul in conversation with ROBERT OPPELT (PART TWO), principal bouble bass, National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), Washington. D.C., (November 19, 2010)

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    Paul in conversation with STEVEN HENDRICKSON (PART ONE), principal trumpet, National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), Washington, D.C., (November 19, 2010)

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    Paul in conversation with STEVEN HENDRICKSON (PART TWO), principal trumpet, National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), Washington, D.C., (November 19, 2010)

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    Paul in conversation with MAESTRO CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH (PART ONE), newly appointed Music Director of the National Symphony in Washington, D.C. (November 19, 2010)

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    Paul in conversation with MAESTRO CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH (PART TWO)

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    Paul in conversation with MAESTRO JAAP VAN ZWEDEN (Dallas Symphony Orchestra) at Bravo! Vail Valley Music Festival, (Colorado, 2010)

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  • CLASSICAL TRAVELS

    Round Top, Texas: 2010 ROUND TOP TEXAS SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL featuring the Texas Festival Orchestra conducted by Christoph Campestrini, with soloists Federico Agostini (violin) and Emilio Colón (cello) performing Brahms' Double Concerto.

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Archive for August 2010

(1st movement) Boccherini Cello Concerto

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 24th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

OFRA HARNOY, cello

00:0000:00

Posted in BOCCHERINI | Comments

(2nd movement) Boccherini Cello Concerto

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 24th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

OFRA HARNOY, cello

00:0000:00

Posted in BOCCHERINI | Comments

(3rd movement) Boccherini Cello Concerto

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 24th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

OFRA HARNOY, cello

00:0000:00

Posted in BOCCHERINI | Comments

(1st movement) Haydn: Symphony No. 44 (Allegro con brio)

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 15th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

00:0000:00

Posted in HAYDN | Comments

(2nd movement) Haydn: Symphony No. 44 (Menuetto allegretto)

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 15th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

00:0000:00

Posted in HAYDN | Comments

(3rd movement) Haydn: Symphony No. 44 (Adagio)

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 15th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

00:0000:00

Posted in HAYDN | Comments

(4th movement) Haydn: Symphony No. 44 (Presto)

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 15th August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

00:0000:00

Posted in HAYDN | Comments

Mahler: Ich hab ein übers Feld (”I Have a Gleaming Knife”)

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 1st August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

MAUREEN FORRESTER, contralto

00:0000:00

Posted in MAHLER | Comments

Mahler: Die zwei blauen Augen von meine Schatz (”My Love’s Two Eyes of Blue”), Maureen Forrester

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 1st August 2010

CJRT Orchestra

PAUL ROBINSON, conductor

MAUREEN FORRESTER, contralto

00:0000:00

Posted in MAHLER | Comments

Maureen Forrester: In Memoriam (1930-2010)

Posted by theartoftheconductor on 1st August 2010

When I was a music student growing up in Toronto, Lois Marshall and Maureen Forrester were already beloved and celebrated figures. I treasured Toscanini’s legendary recording of Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis with Lois Marshall as soprano soloist, and Forrester was known to be a favourite of Bruno Walter. These were great Canadian artists of international reputation.

Lois Marshall passed away some years ago and just recently Maureen Forrester followed, at the age of 79. I never got to know Marshall, but I had the good fortune to collaborate with Maureen on several occasions. She was a good friend of CJRT-FM where I was music director, and she donated her services as did Andrew Davis and the Toronto Symphony for a benefit concert for the station. Later, she joined me and the CJRT Orchestra for a performance of Mahler’s Songs of a Wayfarer. At another concert in 1979 – we gave it the title "The Romantic Spirit" - she performed Schumann’s song cycle Frauenliebe und Leben with pianist Derek Bampton, and then with the CJRT Orchestra we gave the Toronto premiere of R. Murray Schafer’s remarkable Adieu Robert Schumann.

Maureen was a great artist but never let her reputation go to her head. She went about her work with a smile and with a ready and hearty laugh. She was famous and beloved and happy in her life and work. At least this was the public persona. What few admirers knew – at least until the appearance of her autobiography in 1986 – was that there was pain and suffering too. Her first child was born out of wedlock and it was a struggle to persuade the father of her child to do the honorable thing. She raised five fine children with husband Eugene Kash and they shared many happy times together, but the marriage ended in divorce. Maureen struggled with alcoholism, and then came dementia in her later years. She was a successful, complex woman. The public admired the talent, the confidence, the energy and the jolly personality but, by her own confession, she had her demons.

Although Forrester was justly famous for her Mahler, she had a wide repertoire that encompassed a good deal of music by Canadian composers. While she could have lived anywhere in the world after she became famous, she chose to live in Toronto most of her life, traveling frequently to some of the smallest communities in the country. And we shouldn’t forget the good work she did as chairman of the Canada Council to encourage Canadian artists.

For more about Maureen from her own perspective read her autobiography Out of Character (McClelland and Stewart). Apart from the ups and downs of her personal and professional life, Maureen talks about what she learned from the great German actor, Anton Walbrook (The Red Shoes), and about the many coaching sessions she had with Bruno Walter. Then seek out her many fine recordings of music by Mahler, Schumann, Bach, Handel and much more besides.

Subscribers to La Scena Musicale received a Maureen Forrester CD attached to the June, 2010 issue. It includes some of her earliest commercial recordings.

Paul E. Robinson

Posted in PROFILES | Comments